He is horny yet emasculated by his obvious foreignness (he doesn’t know what quiche is and uses a knife and fork like chopsticks).

Only recently has Hollywood deviated a bit from the cliché with characters like Detective Lieutenant Chin Ho Kelly of “Hawaii Five-O.” Walter Hill’s 2013 action film “Bullet to the Head” stars Sylvester Stallone whose character’s daughter initiates a romantic relationship with Asian actor Sung Kang.

Popular culture – movies, TV, cartoons, books – aim to reflect reality and end up reinforcing it as well.

Blacks are depicted in physical violence 56 percent of the time, while whites play violent roles just 11 percent of the time, according to Robert Entman and Andrew Rojecki’s 2000 book “The Black Image in the White Mind.” Blacks are further shown as either lazy or hypersexual, while Asian men, to the extent that they are portrayed at all, are either momma’s boys or effeminate computer dorks with no social skills, Entman says. “Grey’s Anatomy” showed the romances of six white characters – exclusively with other white people – and between a black male, Dr. Even so, if Asians are portrayed as heroes, they are mostly martial arts masters and not necessarily a magnet for women, says James Berardinelli, a film critic at Reelviews Movie Reviews.

“If you can come up with an example [in movies] where an Asian man is shown in a sexual role with a white woman, I’d be shocked. The 2000 blockbuster “Romeo Must Die” features Jet Li’s character who falls for Trish O’Day, the daughter of a money-dealer.

Second, Asian men have been de-sexualized as small and weak brainiacs excelling at math but unable to get the girl, while black women have been seen as too aggressive, independent and outspoken to be proper wives.

The third stereotype portrays whites in a position of power and “globally desired,” a key to gaining a higher social status.

This 1984 Universal Pictures film has 86 percent approval rating by critics on Rotten Tomatoes.

The 1984 American coming-of-age comedy film “Sixteen Candles,” which drew box office sales three times its budget and received mostly positive critical acclaim, portrays the quirky Asian Long Duk Dong who has a fascination with white girls who find him unattractive.Society imposes a “male-superior norm” that a man should be taller than his partner; and blacks are on average taller than whites, who are taller than Asians, he says. I set off to answer the question, What informs our perception of beauty?Is there really something profound about face shape, height and body features that defines attraction?In 1850, the Chinese community of San Francisco consisted of 4018 men and only seven women.In 1855, women made up only 2 percent of the Chinese population in the U.S., and even in 1890 they increased to just 4.8 percent.