As of October 1, 2014, colleges and universities are required to collect and publicly disclose the number of reports of dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking (in addition to sexual assault) that they received each year in order to comply with the Clery Act. “I would hit you, but my words can hurt you more, you stupid bitch.” –Abusive ex-boyfriend as he cornered me in a kitchen and screamed at me.

He confessed to threatening me and to sexually abusing me, but he’s still on campus.

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An offense under Subsection (a-1) is a state jail felony when the person, with criminal negligence and by omission, causes a condition described by Subsection (a-1)(1), (2), or (3).(h) A person who is subject to prosecution under both this section and another section of this code may be prosecuted under either or both sections.

When the conduct is engaged in recklessly, the offense is a state jail felony.(g) An offense under Subsection (a) is a state jail felony when the person acts with criminal negligence.

We’re particularly interested in hearing about strong policies at non-residential schools, as well as practices to support undocumented and/or married domestic violence survivors on college campuses. So much national attention has focused on sexual assault, that it’s easy to forget that both Title IX and the Clery Act protect survivors of gender-based violence more broadly, including victims of dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

Learn your rights by checking out the resources below, and push for your school’s policies and practices to be responsive to the needs of a diversity of experiences of violence. Look up your university’s 2014 Clery statistics on their website (often a Google search of your university’s name and “Clery reports” will turn up the data) and tell us what you find here.

An offense under Subsection (b) is a felony of the third degree.

(a) A person commits an offense if he recklessly engages in conduct that places another in imminent danger of serious bodily injury.(b) A person commits an offense if he knowingly discharges a firearm at or in the direction of:(1) one or more individuals; or(2) a habitation, building, or vehicle and is reckless as to whether the habitation, building, or vehicle is occupied.(c) Recklessness and danger are presumed if the actor knowingly pointed a firearm at or in the direction of another whether or not the actor believed the firearm to be loaded.(d) For purposes of this section, "building," "habitation," and "vehicle" have the meanings assigned those terms by Section 30.01.(e) An offense under Subsection (a) is a Class A misdemeanor. This chapter does not apply to conduct charged as having been committed against an individual who is an unborn child if the conduct is:(1) committed by the mother of the unborn child;(2) a lawful medical procedure performed by a physician or other health care provider with the requisite consent;(3) a lawful medical procedure performed by a physician or other licensed health care provider with the requisite consent as part of an assisted reproduction as defined by Section 160.102, Family Code; or(4) the dispensation of a drug in accordance with law or administration of a drug prescribed in accordance with law. While over the past few years an important national conversation has grown around the experiences and rights of sexual assault survivors on college campuses, there’s been little attention paid to the reality of other forms of campus gender-based violence, particularly those perpetrated by intimate partners. (a) A person commits an offense if, with intent to promote or assist the commission of suicide by another, he aids or attempts to aid the other to commit or attempt to commit suicide.(b) An offense under this section is a Class C misdemeanor unless the actor's conduct causes suicide or attempted suicide that results in serious bodily injury, in which event the offense is a state jail felony. An offense under Subsection (c) is a felony of the third degree. September 1, 2011.(d) For purposes of an omission that causes a condition described by Subsection (a)(1), (2), or (3), the actor has assumed care, custody, or control if he has by act, words, or course of conduct acted so as to cause a reasonable person to conclude that he has accepted responsibility for protection, food, shelter, and medical care for a child, elderly individual, or disabled individual.