These are brand new "1891 Original" pans with the labels still attached. General Housewares continued to manufacture cookware with this logo from 1991 through 1999.General Housewares' Wagner cast iron foundry shut down in 1999, and production of these pans ceased at that time.

In 1991, General Housewares produced a line of "Wagner's 1891" cast iron pans especially to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Wagner cast iron company in 1891.

The "1891 Original" indicates the original year when Wagner began producing cookware.

Here is the current design of the Wagner cast iron skillet logo as displayed on the Web site for the American Culinary Corporation: Modern Wagner Cast Iron Skillet Meanwhile, the Cast Iron Collector Web site provides photos of many genuine vintage cast iron pans from the early days of Wagner Manufacturing, including photos of actual Wagner skillets from the 1890s: If you see this pan being sold as a "vintage antique" at a high price, be sure to laugh out loud and point it out!

Of course, even the "Wagner's 1891 Original" is a cast iron pan.

I've come across several of them myself in antique stores, and I find that if you lay a "Wagner's 1891 Original" pan on a flat surface, there's a chance that it could wobble due to a warped bottom.

Be sure to check for warping before purchasing one of these pans.

It is worth noting that the American Culinary Corporation purchased the Wagner and Griswold brands in 2000, but they no longer manufacture cast iron under these names.

American Culinary continues to promote these modern-day Wagner cast iron pans, but there do not appear to be any pans in existence produced after the Wagner foundry shut down in 1999.

It's not uncommon for pans of this brand to sell for to or so in some antique and second-hand stores.

When brand-new, these pans were sold in boxed sets: These photos were posted by Stephen Robinson to the Cast Iron Cooking group on June 21, 2014.

In this illustration, the reproduction is shown on the left and the authentic Griswold “Erie No. The bright orange rust and the smaller size are tell-tale signs of the reproduction, making spotting the genuine “Erie” easy in this pair.